For more information contact: Boonshoft School of Medicine, Judi Engle, Office of Public Relations, (937) 775-2951

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 4, 2003

Summer Research Program for Students
Fills Gap in Educational System

DAYTON, OHIO-Twelve students from the Dayton area and all over the country interested in research participated in Wright State University's Short-Term Research Experience Access for Minority Students (STREAMS) program this summer. The students will present posters and presentations about their research on August 8, from 1:00-3:00 p.m., in the lobby of the Frederick A. White Health Center on the Wright State University campus. The program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health, is co-directed by Mariana Morris, Ph.D., professor and chair of pharmacology & toxicology, and Shumei Sun, Ph.D., professor of community health, and is coordinated by Mary Key, M. S. Anyone interested in research is invited for the event.

Since June 9, students have performed cardiovascular-related research in areas such as epidemiology, the endocrinology of hypertension, or the cellular and molecular components of cardiovascular disease. Students spent 80 percent of their time in the program doing laboratory research under the supervision of a Wright State faculty mentor. In addition, students gained classroom experience by reading papers from primary literature, presenting scientific talks, and exploring the social and ethical implications of scientific research. Students also attended a career day at Procter & Gamble, where speakers provided the students with first-hand information on available careers in research.

"The exciting thing about the STREAMS summer research program is that we bring a diverse group of students together who work on projects relevant to human health. The program encourages them to see the benefit and the origin of science, and will have a life long effect on their career choice," states Morris. "I think that the program fills an important gap in our educational system-the translation of academic coursework into scientific discovery along with a healthy dose of career counseling."