SESSION 1: Thursday, January 6 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Course Introduction and Overview to Global Health: Health Determinants and Millennium Development Goals Mary White, Ph.D.
  2. Trip Presentations by MSII students Swaziland, Jamaica, Costa Rica
  3. Small Group Discussion: Why do you want to do this? Have you done this before? What do you hope to see and do? What motivates you? How should you prepare? What do you need to know? What are you most excited about?

Readings:
 

Global Health
Development Strategies, pp. 34-51.
Health Determinants, pp. 53-70

SESSION 2: Thursday, January 13 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Trip preparation expectations Kate Cauley, Ph.D. Activities, costs, living arrangements, etc. Where to find travel opportunities
  2. Culture, Health, and HIV Kate Cauley Ph.D., and Cristina Redko, Ph.D. HIV: how it is understood, prevented, treated in S. Africa (myths and truths) Kleinman’s 8 questions
  3. Small groups: Identify American cultural assumptions about health, disease, and health care. Consider trip possibilities. By next week: Identify the country you wish to travel to and form study groups of no more than 5.

Readings:
Mutually Beneficial Global Health Electives. Commentary by Mosepele Mosepele, Sarah Lyon, and C. Jessica Dine, Virtual Mentor, March, 2010.

Global Health
HIV infection and AIDS, pp. 143-152.

World Health Organization HIV Staging Criteria
Arthur Kleinman’s Eight Questions

SESSION 3: Thursday, January 20 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Trip Preparation, Travel Safety, Infectious Disease John Czachor, M.D.
  2. Student Presentation
  3. Small Groups: (research re. chosen country) History, political background, culture, Geography/climate/environment Local health systems

Readings:

Global Health
Communicable Diseases, pp. 137-143; 153-158; 165-176.

SESSION 4: Thursday, January 27 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Water, Sanitation, and Nutrition Thomas Herchline, M.D.
  2. Small Groups: Availability of water, food, sources, Quality, cost, access Health risks, sanitation and hygiene Water borne diseases/parasites
  3. Student Presentation

Readings:

Global Health
Water and Sanitation, pp. 75-79
Food, pp. 70-75
Nutritional Disorders, pp. 177-198.

SESSION 5: Thursday, February 3 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Maternal and Child Health, Reproductive Health Jan Duke, MD.
  2. Small Groups: Gender issues Women’s roles/social power Reproductive rights Availability of contraception/abortion Circumscision Availability of CHWs, midwives, access to obstetric care Child nutrition/malnutrition Use of traditional medicine
  3. Student Presentation

Readings:

Global Health
Sexual and Reproductive Health, pp. 239-249.

SESSION 6: Thursday, February 10 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Engineering and Global Health Tim Wood, Ph.D. Stephen Donnelly, MS-II
  2. Small Groups: Issues and opportunities in global health and engineering Appropriate technology Obstacles to sustainability
  3. Student Presentation

Readings:
Dorf R (2001) Technology, Humans and Society. (Academic Press), pp. 100-120, 159-164.

SESSION 7: Thursday, February 17 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Chronic Illness: Cardiac Disease Zula Mazimba, MD.
  2. Small Groups: Chronic illness management Obesity Diabetes Cancer Heart disease Complete trip prep
  3. Student Presentation

Readings:

Global Health
Non-Communicable Diseases, pp. 207-219

SESSION 8: Thursday, February 24 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. International medical graduates panel Where are you from and why did you come here? What did you have to do to be accepted into a US residency program? What have been the most striking differences between American medicine and your home hospitals? What has been most challenging? Rewarding? Surprising?
  2. Student Presentation
  3. Student Presentation

Readings:
James Hallock, Stephen Seeling, and John Norcini, (2003) The International Medical Graduate Pipeline. Health Affairs. 22(4): 94-96.
Ranjana Srivastava (2008) A Bridge to Nowhere—The Troubled Trek of Foreign Medical Graduates. NEJM 358; 3: 216-219.

SESSION 9: Thursday, March 3 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Refugee Care Panel: Catholic Social Services, AFSC Cristina Redko, Ph.D. Sylvia Gleason, M.D. Who is living in Dayton as a refugee? What are their health needs? How do they get medical care? What are the challenges to accessing health care? What kinds of assistance can be most helpful?
  2. Small Groups Are there refugees from your destination country here in the USA? Where are they and what are their primary health needs? How can knowledge of their country and culture contribute to providing health care for them?
  3. Student Presentation

Readings:
Hequet M (2007) Global Health Hot Zone. Minnesota Medicine. March.
Stauffer WM and Rothenberger M (2007) Hearing Hoofbeats, Thinking Zebras. Minnesota Medicine. March.

SESSION 10: Thursday, March 11 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM - 120 WH
  1. Student Presentation
  2. Student Presentation
  3. Small Groups: Codes of Ethics Prepare and submit completed group code of ethics Professionalism Attitudes Safety Boundaries Impact

Readings:
John A. Crump, Jeremy Sugarman (2008) Ethical Considerations for Short-term Experiences by Trainees in Global health. JAMA. 300(12): 1456-1458.
Sarah Lanier, Foreign to Familiar, McDougal Publishing, 2000