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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 24, 2003

National Institutes of Health Selects Jay Dean, Ph.D.

DAYTON, OHIO-Jay B. Dean, Ph.D., has been selected by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Department of Health and Human Services to serve as a member of the Respiratory Physiology Study Section.

Members are selected to serve based on their demonstrated competence and achievement in their scientific disciplines, as evidenced by the quality of their research, publications, and achievements. Study section appointees review grant applications, make recommendations to NIH, and survey the quality of research in fields of science. "The function of these members of the scientific community are of great value to medical and allied research in this country," states Ellie Ehrenfeld, Ph.D., director for the NIH Center for Scientific Review in Bethesda, Md.

"This selection underscores the value of Dr. Dean's contributions to the field of respiratory physiology and recognizes the high caliber of research here at Wright State," says Howard Part, M.D., dean at Wright State University School of Medicine.

Dr. Dean is the Wright State University Brage Golding Distinguished Professor of Research and professor and acting chair of the Department of Anatomy and Physiology at Wright State University School of Medicine. He holds a B.S. in biology with minors in chemistry and conservation from Central Michigan University, an M.S. in biological sciences from Michigan Technological University, and a Ph.D. in physiology from The Ohio State University. He has been a faculty member at WSU since 1991.

Dr. Dean's research of the brain stem, specifically gas-sensitive nerve cells that control respiration, has implication for understanding disorders such as sleep apnea, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and central nervous system oxygen toxicity. He is considered one of the leading experts in hyperbaric neurophysiology, and his research has attracted more than $3.6 million in external funding from the Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research, plus others.