For more information contact: Boonshoft School of Medicine, Judi Engle, Office of Public Relations, (937) 775-2951

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 27, 1998

Wright State Celebrates
Brain Awareness Week on March 16

DAYTON, OHIO -- Wright State University will celebrate Brain Awareness Week on Monday, March 16 with a variety of demonstrations and activities that convey the wide-reaching possibilities of current brain research. The event runs from 1:00-5:00 p.m. in room 156 of Wright State's Student Union. The event is free and open to the public.

Brain Awareness Week activities include: hands-on opportunities to explore state-of-the-art computer programs used to teach neuroscience at Wright State; demonstrations of neurological tests that doctors use to evaluate brain and nervous system function; demonstrations of microscopes and other laboratory technologies used in neuroscience research; and games and illusions for all ages that illustrate the complex functions of the human brain.

Brain Awareness Week was launched as a nationwide annual campaign three years ago to educate the public about brain diseases and disorders as well as the prospects for current research in neuroscience. Brain Awareness Week activities at
Wright State are sponsored by the Society for Neuroscience and the Department of Anatomy at Wright State University School of Medicine.

Brain and spinal cord trauma affect more than one million people each year, and associated health care costs exceeding $40 billion per year. Neuroscientists strive to better understand the fundamental properties of brain and nerve cells and their reaction to a variety of damaging events including trauma, metabolic disorders and degenerative diseases. "While there has been some encouraging progress, such as the possibility of promoting the regeneration of severed spinal cord cells, many fundamental issues remain to be solved in neuroscience," explains Dr. Robert Fyffe, professor of anatomy at Wright State. "Fortunately, recent progress at the cellular level shows promise for filling these gaps in our understanding. "We expect neuroscience to make significant contributions to medical knowledge for many years to come," Dr. Fyffe continues. "We hope students of all ages will visit the Brain Awareness Week displays at Wright State to learn more about careers in this exciting field."

Internet users can learn more about Brain Awareness Week at the Society for Neuroscience web site http://www.sfn.org/BAW/. For more information about activities at Wright State, contact Dr. Patrick Carr, Brain Awareness Week coordinator, at 937/775-3017.