Archived Page.

 

Internal Medicine

Objectives Readings/Assignments Policies Clerkship Sites Evaluations/Assessments Academic Half Days
Ambulatory Rotation and Conferences Writing and Presenting Cases Hospital Rotations Schedules Ambulatory / Inpatient Student Forms

 

Objectives:

Internal Medicine Clerkship Educational Objectives

 

Knowledge and Lifelong Learning

 
 Interpersonal and Communication

 
Professionalism, Advocacy, and Personal Growth

 

  1. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine Clerkship, the student will know the fundamentals of adult care that all graduates of BSOM should know, regardless of their subsequent careers. The categories of knowledge to be emphasized include:

    1. The care of healthy adults;

    2. The evaluation of patients’ presenting clinical problems, including:
      Chest pain, Dyspnea, Joint pain, GI Bleed, Jaundice, Renal failure, Delirium, Fever, Anemia

    3. The diagnosis and management of patients with acute and chronic diseases, including:
      Heart failure, Venous thromboembolism, Hypertension, Dementia, Stroke, Diabetes Mellitus, Pneumonia, Common Cancers

  2. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine Clerkship, the student will be able to demonstrate the systematic approach the care of adult patients (the “methods” of Internal Medicine). These emphasize:

    1. Sound skills in gathering clinical findings through the medical history and physical examination;

    2. Sensible interpretation of clinical findings and test results;

    3. Robust diagnostic reasoning;

    4. Sensible therapeutic decision-making;

    5. Presentation of patient information and plans orally and in written documentation.

  3. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine Clerkship the student will be able to demonstrate effective skills in navigating the medical literature to find answers to clinical care questions, which serves both responsible patient care and effective lifelong learning. These skills include:

    1. Formulation of a focused ‘foreground’ clinical question;

    2. Search of the relevant knowledge resources to find evidence that addresses the questions;

    3. Critical appraisal of the retrieved evidence, making judgments about its validity, importance, and applicability to the clinical situation;

    4. Integration of this retrieved and appraised evidence, along with other knowledge, into sound clinical decisions;

    5. Summarizing this episode of evidence-based learning into a concise synopsis that can be placed into a learning portfolio.

  4. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine Clerkship, the student will be able to establish professional relationships with, and communicate effectively with patients and their families, including patients from diverse cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic backgrounds.

  5. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine Clerkship, the student will be able to establish professional relationships with, and communicate effectively with other health care team members. Interpersonal and Communication

  6. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine Clerkship, the student will be able to work effectively with the broad, interdisciplinary team involved in patient care. This will include knowledge of the complimentary skills various team members bring to patient care and how to access them appropriately.

  7. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine Clerkship, the student will demonstrate the ability to:

    1. Act with honesty and integrity while maintaining ethical duties to patients and others

    2. Relate to patient care in a manner that is dependable, dedicated and punctual

    3. Act with patience, altruism and equanimity

  8. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine clerkship, the student will demonstrate the ability to acquire and soundly manage knowledge, including:

    1. Acknowledging when they don’t know something;

    2. Asking questions of others, where and when appropriate to do so;

    3. Carrying out reading directed by patient circumstances or other important topics;

    4. Effectively managing knowledge resources of different kinds, including those for ‘background’ and for ‘foreground’ knowledge

    5. Sharing the yield of these learning efforts with others on the team, i.e. teaching.

  9. Upon completion of the Internal Medicine Clerkship, the student will demonstrate the ability to seek out and listen to feedback on performance, accept it positively, and respond to it constructively by improving performance.


 

Readings/Assignments:


 

Clerkship Policies:

Revised 14 April 2010

 

Assignment of Students to Rotations and to Hospital Teams:

Students are assigned to rotate at two hospitals and one office site by the Clerkship Coordinator with the Clerkship Director. Please direct any questions you have about these assignments to them. Once you’ve been assigned to a specific hospital, the on-site Clerkship coordinator and the Associate Clerkship Director assign you to a particular team with a specific call schedule, so they can answer your questions about those aspects.

All students are expected to report on Day #1 of each rotation (Monday – Sunday), unless otherwise noted acc/to clerkship schedule.

 

On Call Duties:

While on hospital rotations, your call schedule will mirror the schedule of the R1 on the team (or half of the team) to which you’ve been assigned [see exceptions below]. While the specific times and days differ among hospitals, this generally means that you are on call roughly every 4th night, including weekends. The majority of hospitals use a night float system, so you will rarely stay overnight. On the first day of the rotation, you are strongly encouraged to review the call schedule with the resident team. Again, if your team stays for overnight call, you are expected to do so.

Exceptions (even if your R1 is on call on these days, you are excused):

  1. You may leave the hospital at 8:00 pm the evening before the 3 Internal Medicine tests.
  2. You will not be on overnight call the last day of month one and month two of the Clerkship.
  3. You will not be on overnight call the last Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday of the Clerkship.
  4. You will not be on overnight call prior to our weekly afternoon teaching sessions.

 

Absences from Internal Medicine Clerkship:
(Please refer, also, to the B2 website policy page)

The Internal Medicine Clerkship is a very demanding rotation, both clinically and academically, so you are strongly encouraged to avoid any absences. Unexcused absences will be reflected poorly on your evaluations and may reduce your grade. Since some absences may be unavoidable, here is how you should handle them so they become ‘excused’:

  1. Absences Due to Illness or Personal/Family Emergency:
     
    As soon as the crisis develops, please notify BOTH the WSU Clerkship Coordinator/Director and the team members or preceptor on your clinical assignment. The WSU Clerkship Director and Associate Clerkship Director will work with you to develop an individualized plan for making up time, depending on such things as the particular nature of the crisis, the number of days you will be gone, and your ability to work ‘full speed’ upon return. Some general points:
    1. If you miss more than two days due to personal illness, you will be asked to submit a note from your personal physician excusing your absence and your ability to return to the rotation.
    2. If illness or emergency cause you to miss call duties, you will be asked to make up the call at the clinical site.
    3. If you have a total of more than five days (more than 2/month the first two, and one the last) of excused absence from the Clerkship, you will be expected to make up the time before receiving a Clerkship grade.
       
  2. Absences Due to Other Activities:
    1. You are strongly encouraged to minimize your absence from the Clerkship for non-emergent reasons.
    2. To arrange an excused absence for a non-emergent reason (e.g., wedding, conference), please notify the Clerkship Director and Clerkship Coordinator in writing/email at least 30 days in advance, stating the details of the request. We may or may not be able to grant every request.
    3. If such an absence causes you to miss call duties, you will be asked to make up the call at the clinical site.
    4. During your absence, you will still be expected to keep up with your academic duties, including preparing for the Team Learning sessions and the examinations.
    5. If you have a total of more than five days of excused absence from the Clerkship, you will be expected to make up the time before receiving a Clerkship grade.

 

Holidays During the Internal Medicine Clerkship:

There are two different situations regarding holidays during the Clerkship:

  1. WSU Schedule for Third Year: The school of medicine plans the specific start and stop dates of the clinical rotations to include the Christmas/New Year holiday break and a week before or after the Clerkship. These are built into our Clerkship schedule, so all students get these days off.

  2. All Other Holidays: Regardless of whether WSU or the state or federal governments observe other holidays, during the Internal Medicine Clerkship the student’s schedule is determined by the clinical site to which the student is assigned. Thus, during the ambulatory rotation, many offices will close on federal holidays. During the inpatient rotations, since hospitals don’t close, the resident teams may be on call over the holidays, usually on a schedule like a weekend day. At the beginning of the month, you are strongly encouraged to go over the holiday schedule with the resident team.

 

Procedures:

There are no required procedures for students in the Internal Medicine Clerkship. However, since many of our patients will need procedures, the Clerkship provides students with the opportunity to learn about a wide range of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Students are strongly encouraged to observe all procedures done to patients they are following, whenever possible. When learning about procedures, students should learn not only about proper technique, but also about indications for the procedure, contraindications to the procedure, potential complications, and post-procedure monitoring. If the student observes a procedure or performs a procedure, it must be done under the direct supervision of the resident or the attending and logged into the RMS procedure logger system.

 

Parking Passes:

All students will be assigned a Miami Valley Hospital parking pass during their clerkship with Internal Medicine to attend weekly Academic Half Days, weekly Ambulatory Conferences, and Clerkship Tests.

  • Issued first day of clerkship and returned on the Thursday before the shelf exam.
  • If parking pass is lost contact the clerkship coordinator.
  • You must turn this in before you can take the shelf exam.
  • No Clerkship grade will be issued to the student if this is not returned.

 

Pagers:

All students will be assigned a pager at the hospital site. It is the student’s responsibility to return their pager on the last day of each block rotation.

  • Issued first day of rotation and returned by 10 am on the Thursday before the shelf exam.
  • If pager is lost you will be held financially responsible. There is a $75.00 cost for the replacement.
  • You must turn this in before you can take the shelf exam.
  • No Clerkship grade will be issued to the student if this is not returned.

 

H/P Cards:

Turn in 4 H/P cards at the end of each hospital rotation either: a) directly to the clerkship coordinator; b) to the H/P card box outside the DOM office; or c) at Academic Half Day. Our faculty members are NOT expected to give you a passing score on the H & P’s if turned in after the end of their scheduled time on your team. A good rule of thumb is to turn in an H & P weekly while doing inpatient medicine.

RMS Procedure Logger:

Log your procedures before the end of each month using either the on-line format or a paper spreadsheet (distributed at orientation). It is expected that you log ALL patients you have a substantive interaction with this quarter (ie: took a history, did a physical, did an assessment and plan, etc.)


 

Clerkship Sites:

WSU Internal Medicine – MSIII Hospital Points of Contact

Location
Contact Name
Title
Business Phone
E-Mail
WSU IM Dept –
MVH Weber CHE Bldg, 2nd floor, 128 E Apple St, Dayton, Oh 45409-2902
Karen Kirkham, M.D.
Clerkship Director
937-208-2861
937-623-3889 cell
Rajil Karnani, M.D.
Associate Clerkship Director
937-208-2864
Donna Thiede
Clerkship Coordinator
937-208-2864
937-208-2621 FAX
Location
Contact Name
Title
Business Phone
E-Mail
MVH Weber CHE
Bldg, 2nd floor, 128 E
Apple St, Dayton, Oh
45409-2902
Charlie Abraham, M.D.
MVH Associate Clerkship Director
937-208-2010
Donna Thiede
Clerkship Coordinator
937-208-2864
937-208-2621 FAX
Location
Contact Name
Title
Business Phone
E-Mail
Good Samaritan
Hospital

2222 Philadelphia Dr.
Dayton, Ohio 45406
David Ellison, M.D.
Associate
Clerkship Director
937-278-2612 x3304
276-8323 Clinic
Geneal Knott
Coordinator
937-278-2612 x3301
937-276-8253 FAX
Location
Contact Name
Title
Business Phone
E-Mail
Kettering Medical
Center

3535 Southern Blvd.
Kettering, Oh 45429
John Shrader, M.D.
Associate
Clerkship Director
937-395-8693
Amy Hoeffel
Coordinator
937-395-8803
937-395-8399 FAX
Location
Contact Name
Title
Business Phone
E-Mail
Mt. Carmel Hospital
793 W. State St.
Columbus, Oh 43222-
1560
Pat Ecklar, M.D.
Associate
Clerkship Director
614-234-9822
614-234-4272
(secure fax)
Lori Cropper
Coordinator
614-234-5354
614-234-2772 FAX
Location
Contact Name
Title
Business Phone
E-Mail
VA Medical Cntr
4100 W. Third St.
Dayton Oh 45428
Michael Kaplon, M.D.
Associate
Clerkship Director
937-268-6511 x2340
Toni Odemokpa
Coordinator
937-262-2110
937-267-3917 FAX
Location
Contact Name
Title
Business Phone
E-Mail
WPAFB Medical
Center
4881 Sugar Maple Dr.
WPAFB, Oh 45422
Sven Raymond, M.D.
Associate
Clerkship Director
937-257-1559
Barbara Carroll
(WP-SGOMI Int Med A)
Coordinator
937-257-9655
937-522-3285 FAX

AMBULATORY

Name

Phone

Fax

Address

Ladonna Barnes-Lark, MD
461-4336
461-9698
Community Heath Center of Greater Dayton, 1323 W. Third St. #3, Dayton, Oh 45407
Atindra Chatterji, MD
233-5816
233-2337
8701 Old Troy Pike #70, Huber Heights, Oh 45424
Louis Heckman, MD
208-6920
208-7270
ASIM-South Med, 7707 Paragon Rd. Centerville, Oh 45459
John Hughes, MD
208-2004 main number
208-8828
Med Surg Health Center, 725 S. Ludlow St., Dayton, Oh
Chaltanya Kadakia, MD
937-277-2121
277-2213
7111 N. Main St. ste 10, Dayton, OH 45415
Gurjeet Kahlon, MD
937-208-8280
208-8293
208-7355
Valley Medical Primary Care Inc., 6611 Clyo Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45459
John Mauer, MD
937-298- 8058
298-5638 FAX
540 Lincoln Park Blvd ste 200Kettering, OH 45429
Diklar Makola, MD
866-3336
865-0122 FAX
415 Byers Rd. #100, Miamisburg, Oh 45342
Raj Mehta, MD
866-3336,
477-7336
865-0122 FAX
415 Byers Rd. #100, Miamisburg, Oh 45342
Miguel Parilo, MD
937-208- 9090
937-208-9075
Bull Family Diabetes Center, 1222 S. Patterson Blvd. #210, Dayton, Oh 45402
Robert Sawyer, MD
937-384- 6800
384-6938 FAX
Sycamore Primary Care, 2115 Leiter Rd. Ste 300, Miamisburg, Oh 45324
Jason Schatzel, MD
937-832- 9322
836-4152 FAX
9000 N. Main St #305Dayton, OH 45415
Todd Sobol, MD
937-836- 8063
836-8296 FAX
8913 N. Main St., Dayton, OH 45415
Alvin Stein, MD
937-836- 8063
836-8296 FAX
8913 N. Main St., Dayton, OH 45415
Anton Vasiliu, MD
937-208- 8282
208-8275 FAX
Valley Medical Primary Care Inc., 6611 Clyo Rd. Centerville, Oh 45459
Frank Von Maluski
937-208- 6920
937-208-6948 FAX
Assoc Spec of IM, 7700 Paragon Rd #101, Cent, Oh 45459

 


 

Evaluations/Assessments:

Evaluation and Grading for Internal Medicine Clerkship
Boonshoft School of Medicine (BSOM) at Wright State University

Last updated: 14 April 2010

 

Students will pass the Internal Medicine Clerkship after meeting criteria for Clerkship completion and passing, including:

  1. Completion of 12 weeks of Clerkship, including all required rotations
  2. Excused absences of no more than 5 days in 12 weeks, and no unexcused absences
  3. Satisfactory performance for each of the six ACGME competencies
  4. Satisfactory and timely completion of 8 required History and Physical write-ups
  5. Satisfactory and timely completion of the required CAT assignment
  6. Timely submission of required portfolio elements, including patient logs, H&P cards
  7. Timely return of Clerkship materials, including beepers and parking passes
  8. Passing the NBME Internal Medicine Subject ‘Shelf’ examination with a score at or above the 5th percentile (based on the prior year’s whole year results)
  9. Achievement of composite numeric Clerkship grade of 75.0 or higher
  10. Decision to pass by the Internal Medicine Clerkship Steering Committee

All students are routinely reviewed at the Steering Committee meetings on a regular schedule before final grade is assigned and passing is decided. Students may also be discussed at any scheduled meeting if there have been interim concerns raised about student performance or well-being. The committee discusses performance in the six core competencies of the ACGME, including patient care, medical knowledge, professionalism, communication, systems based practice, and practice based learning and improvement. Sources of information include, but are not limited to, scheduled formal evaluations by supervising attending physicians and residents, Associate Clerkship Directors, and the Clerkship Director, along with spontaneous or requested verbal or written feedback from multiple sources (e.g. faculty, residents, other students, nurses, other staff, patients, and student self evaluations), as well as information contributed by members of the Steering Committee during the discussions. If the Steering Committee finds reason to believe the student has performed substantially below expectation in any of the 6 core competencies, the Committee will decide the student should not pass the Clerkship, even with a composite numeric score of 75.0 or higher.

At the end of this review, the Steering Committee decides: a) whether each student passes the Clerkship; b) whether to accept or adjust the composite numeric score; c) whether to accept or adjust the narrative summary of students’ performance; and, d) if a student does not pass, what the nature of remediation should be (e.g. make up time, repeat Clerkship, or other). The Clerkship Director or designee submits the final report to the BSOM.

Assessment of Student Performance

Contribution

Clinical and educational evaluations:

Attendings

25%

Residents

15%

Associate Clerkship Directors

5%

Clerkship Director

2%

Subtotal:

47%

Portfolio:

H&P cards

(8 @ 0.1%)

0.8%

Procedure Logs

(3 @ 0.1%)

0.3%

CAT project

1.9%

Subtotal:

3%

Testing:

Academic Half Days:

iRAT (10 @ 1%)

10%

 

gRAT (10 @ 0.5%)

5%

Clerkship MedTests

(3 @ 5%)

15%

NBME Shelf Exam

 

20%

Subtotal:

50%


 

Academic Half Days

Academic Half Days

 

Learning Internal Medicine

  • FAQs:

How can I best organize my studying

How can I summarize the clinical sciences

How could I diagram

How can I summarize my systematic

How can I summarize my systematic (diagram)

 

Classrooms in Miami Valley Hospital

IMC Assigned Readings

Blank Test Table

Blank Treatment Table

Table 1: Differential Diagnosis

Academic Half Day schedule

Academic Half Days:

In most weeks during this 3 month Clerkship, all students currently assigned to Internal Medicine will convene at Miami Valley Hospital on selected afternoons for the ‘Academic Half Days’. These sessions will provide a variety of activities to aid your learning of Internal Medicine.

Most of these sessions concern material from a whole specialty of Internal Medicine, e.g. Cardiology, Pulmonology, Rheumatology, etc. An exception is the session on Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, Smoking Cessation, and Composite Cardiovascular Risk.

These subsequent Academic Half Days will operate on a modified Team Learning format. All students taking the Clerkship together are divided in teams. For each of these sessions, you are expected to prepare by studying ahead of time the required readings [Please find listing of relevant assignments on this website]. The session will begin with a 10 question quiz that you take individually (the ‘i-RAT’) and then again as a group (the ‘g-RAT’). We will then review the quiz questions and answers for learning. Next, working in teams, students will work through the cases found in the Application Exercises for each session. In addition, we may use a variety of other learning tools, including unknown cases and interactive large group discussions.

The work you do during these Academic Half Days will count toward your numeric grade. [Please see section on Evaluation and Grading for details], so you are strongly encouraged to prepare.

 

  • Cardiovascular

Dubin's EKG

Learning Objectives: CHEST PAIN

Learning Objectives: HEART FAILURE

 

  • Pulmonary

Learning Objectives: DYSPNEA

Learning Objectives: VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM

 

  • Rheumatology

Learning Objectives: ACUTE JOINT PAIN, e.g. of Knee

Learning Objectives: POLYARTICULAR ARTHRITIS

 

  • Gastroenterology

Learning Objectives: GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

Learning Objectives: LIVER DISEASE

 

  • Nephrology/Acid-Base

Learning Objectives: ACUTE RENAL FAILURE AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

Article Dr. Wood

A Practical Approach to Acid-Base Disorders

 

  • Hypertension/Cardio Risk

Learning Objectives: HYPERTENSION

Learning Objectives: DYSLIPIDEMIA

Learning Objectives: SMOKING CESSATION

Assessing Cardiovascular Risk And Treatment Benefit

Evidence based management of hypertension

Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program

The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention

Smoking cessation

In the Clinic: Smoking Cessation

 

  • Neurology/Geriatrics

Learning Objectives: ALTERED MENTAL STATUS

 

  • Endocrinology

Learning Objectives: DIABETES MELLITUS

Standards in Med Care in Diabetes

In the Clinic: Type 2 Diabetes

 

  • Infectious Disease

Learning Objectives: FEVER

Learning Objectives: PNEUMONIA

 

  • Hematology/Oncology

Learning Objectives: ANEMIA

Learning Objectives: COMMON CANCERS

 

  • AHD Wrap-Up

FAQ: Personal Statement


 

Ambulatory Rotation and Conferences:

Ambulatory Rotation and Conferences

 

 

  • CAT Project & FAQs:

Instructions for CAT Assignment (Pages 1-3)

What is a CAT? (Pages 4-5)

Sample ‘First Page’- Case Synopsis, etc. (Page 6)

Sample Critical Appraisal- Disease Probability ((Pages 7-8)

Sample CAT ((Page 9)

Blank CAT

Blank First Page

Blank CA Table

Users’ Guides...

Librarian Hours at White Hall

 

  • Critical Appraisal Worksheets (Blank):

CA Worksheet RCT

CA Worksheet SR RCT

CA Worksheet Pr

CA Worksheet DxT

CA Worksheet Dx CDR

CA Worksheet Pr CDR

CA Worksheet CPG

CA Worksheet H

CA Worksheet PD+ for DDx

CA Worksheet Scr

CA Worksheet SR DxT


 

Writing and Presenting Cases:

 

  • Files for Writing and Presenting Cases

Writing & Presenting Cases Introduction

 

  • Presenting a "new" patient

FAQ: How should I present...

 

  • Presenting a "old" patient

FAQ: How should I present...

 

  • Progress Notes

FAQ: Sample Progress Note

 

  • H&P's

FAQ: Sample H&P (document)

FAQ: Writing a Useful History of Present Illness (document)

FAQ: What are the seven dimensions … (document)

FAQ: Writing a Useful Past History (document)

FAQ: Writing a Useful Assessment & Plan (document)


 

Hospital Rotations:

 

During the three months of the Internal Medicine Clerkship, each student is assigned to two hospital medicine blocks, each around a month long. [Please see the ‘Student Assignment’ schedule for your specific assignments]. During each hospital rotation, you will be assigned to an inpatient team, consisting of a combination of subinterns, first year residents, senior residents, and attending physicians. You join this team in nearly all of its activities, working together for most or all of the month.

Clinical Duties:

1. Daily rounds: Rounds occur each day, usually in the morning, and are of two types:

  1. 'Work Rounds’: where you and the team see each patient, write daily notes and orders
  2. ‘Attending Rounds’: where the team meets with the attending to plan care Although the exact schedule varies from hospital to hospital, work rounds often begin 7 – 7:30 am.

2. On call: Your call schedule mirrors the schedule of the first year resident to whom you are assigned on the team, with call scheduled usually every 4th night (overnight call rarely). Again, the exact schedule varies from hospital to hospital, so check with your resident team for the specifics. Most of the hospitals use a Night Float system, so that the team leaves the hospital after completing the work on most call nights. On weekends, your schedule continues to mirror the R1’s schedule, including both days on and days off.

Exceptions (even if your R1 is on call on these days, you are excused):

  1. You may leave the hospital at 8:00 pm the evening before the 3 Internal Medicine tests.
  2. You will not be on overnight call the last day of month one and month two of the Clerkship.
  3. You will not be on overnight call the last Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday of the Clerkship.
  4. You will not be on overnight call the night before our weekly class sessions.

3. Patient care: You are expected to follow two to three patients daily, which means taking 1 or 2 admissions each time while on call every 4th night. For each patient, you are expected to see them each day and write a structured progress note (in either SOAP or modified-SOAP format) [Please see section on Write-ups for a sample progress note in modified SOAP format]. For those working in hospitals with paper records, you may write orders under supervision of your residents, and these orders need to be countersigned before they can be taken off. You are also expected to present your patients during Attending Rounds and be ready to discuss the status of your patients’ problems and the team’s plans for care. You are encouraged to observe when residents or consultants perform procedures on the patients you follow. Also, the team may ask you to help do clinical work on other patients on the team.

4. There are 2 ways to enter patient log information. Either the patient log form on MEDU or by entering the patient log on RMS Procedure logger. You are to enter patient information for each patient you admit and/or follow.

Academic Duties:

  1. Academic Half Days: You are required to attend the Academic Half Days throughout the Internal Medicine Clerkship. [Please see section on Academic Half Day for the detailed schedule]. While your residents and attending will have been told of this requirement, they are unlikely to remember the schedule, so you will likely need to remind them when it occurs.

  2. Write Full History & Physicals: You are required to submit 4 written H&P’s to your attending for evaluation and comment during each month, for a total of 8 throughout the Clerkship. [Please see section on Write-ups for more detailed instructions].

  3. Attending Rounds: You are required to take full part in Attending Rounds. While the features of these rounds will vary from team to team, you will be expected to present the patients you’re following, review the status of their problems, and describe concisely your reasoning about what is wrong, what it might mean and what should be done. To prepare for Rounds, you are strongly encouraged to practice your presentations [Please see section on Write-ups for advice about presenting well]. Also, you are strongly encouraged to read about the problems and disorders of the team’s patients, not just those you are following. [Please see section on Learning Internal Medicine for advice on how to do this well].

  4. Associate Clerkship Director (ACD) Rounds: At most hospitals, the ACD holds rounds with all the students assigned to that hospital that month, usually scheduled once weekly. On the first day at each hospital, the ACD will review the schedule of these sessions with you. The specific nature of the rounds also varies from hospital to hospital.

  5. Resident Conferences: You are encouraged to take part in the conferences scheduled for the residents on your team, as long as they do not conflict with your required conferences. While the specific conferences vary from hospital to hospital, they usually include Morning Report, Noon Conference, Morbidity and Mortality Rounds, and Grand Rounds.

 


 

Student Assignments: Ambulatory/Inpatient


 

Student Forms: