Division of Epidemiology Active Funded Research Support

Adiposity, Disease Risk Factors, and Lifetime Health
PD/PI: Czerwinski SA
Co-Is: Choh AC, Duren DL, Lee M, Nahhas RW, Towne B
Funding Agency: NIH/NICHD R01HD012252
7/10/2010–6/30/2015

This project involves the collection and analysis of long-term serial data from the Fels Longitudinal Study. Data are related to indices and measures of body fatness, adipose tissue distribution, lifestyle, lipids and lipoproteins, blood pressure, and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Analyses concern prediction of future states, associations among measures of body composition and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and patterns of change in individuals.


Genetic Epidemiology of Ocular Health and Disease
Subcontract PD/PI: Towne B
Funding Agency: NIH/NEI (R01EY024384)
Subcontract from Texas Biomedical Research Institute
06/01/2014–05/31/2019

The goals of this project are to localize and identify genes influencing standard measures of eye health and vision acuity in a large pedigree from the Jirel ethnic group in eastern Nepal.


Post Baccalaureate Research Education (PREP)
PD/PI: Czerwinski, SA
Mentor: Lee M
Funding Agency: NIH/NIGMS (GM086257)
Dates: 03/01/2010–02/28/2015

Supports the research training and education of recent baccalaureate graduates from groups underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral research areas, who plan to pursue Ph.D. degrees. This research apprenticeship serves as an educational transition for recent baccalaureate graduates who will acquire essential academic credentials and research skills to make them more competitive for Ph.D. programs at highly selective institutions.


Short-term Training for Minority Students Program
PD/PI: Czerwinski SA
Mentor: Lee M
Funding Agency: NIH/NHLBI (HL103168)
06/01/2010–02/28/2016

The major goal of this project is to give short-term training in the cardiovascular sciences with emphasis on basic mechanisms of cellular and neural physiology, cardiovascular and endocrine control/epidemiology to minority undergraduates.