Integrated Residency in Emergency Medicine

Edward Fieg, D.O., Director

Glenn Hamilton

 

 

Glenn C. Hamilton, M.D., M.S.M.

Professor Emeritus

glenn.hamilton@wright.edu

 

"Fortune smiles on the prepared mind."
— Louis Pasteur


Education

Medical School: University of Michigan, 1973.

Residency: Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, 1975-1976; Emergency Medicine, Denver General/St. Anthony Program, 1977-1979.

Fellowship: Sloan Management Program, Stanford University Graduate School of Business, 1989-1990.

Research Interests

Education Methodology, Curriculum Design, Medical Readiness, Presenting Signs and Symptoms

Recent and Active Grants/Contracts

Introducing Emergency Medicine into China, 1997-2002 (Second five years), $434,000, China Medical Board of NYC, Inc., and China Medical University, Shenyang, PRC.

Basic and Advanced Disaster Life Support Training, 2006-08, $298,000 annually, Ohio Department of Health.

"ACC Emergency Preparedness", Ohio Department of Health, Grant 667064, $3,023,466, 2007-2009, Co-investigators: Mark Gebhart, MD, Glenn C. Hamilton, MD

"Calamityville Campus Project", Ohio Department of Development, Grant 667106, $1,200,000, 2007-2009, Co-investigators: Mark Gebhart, MD, Glenn C. Hamilton, MD

"ACC Emergency Preparedness" Ohio Department of Health, Grant 667064, $1,047,560, 2008-2009 Co-investigators: Mark Gebhart, MD, Glenn C. Hamilton, MD

Primary contact for additional sources of funding for Calamityville Project: State of Ohio Capital Budget, 2009, $3,000,000.

"National Center for Medical Readiness, "GCAA-FA8650-09-2-6035. Federal: U.S. Department of Defense, 2009-2011, $3,000,000. Primary Investigators: Glenn C. Hamilton, MD, Mark Gebhart, MD.

"Regional Healthcare Preparedness Grant," 10-384-10, Greater Dayton Hospital Association, $175,000, 2010, Primary Investigator: Glenn C. Hamilton, MD.

Selected Bibliography

Papers:

Russi C.S., Hamilton G.C. A case for emergency medicine in the undergraduate medical school curriculum, Acad. Emerg. Med., 2005; 10:994-8.

Stepaniak PC, Hamilton GC, Olson JE, et al. Physiologic Effects of Simulated + Gx Orbital Reentry Profiles in Hemorrhagic Shock Modeled Primates. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine 2007; (4, Suppl.): A14-A25.

Manuals/texts:

Hamilton G.C. Three-part teaching manual for medical students/residents in EM: Student workbook, instructor guide, question data bank, printed by Department of Emergency Medicine, WSUSOM, 1992, revised 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003 (based on Clinical Problem Solving text).

Hamilton G.C. Presenting Signs and Symptoms in the Emergency Department, Philadelphia, Williams and Wilkins, 1993.

Hamilton G.C. Sanders A., Strange G.S., Trott A.T., Emergency Medicine: An Approach to Clinical Problem Solving, 2nd Edition, Philadelphia, Saunders Co., 2003.

Dr. Hamilton was an associate editor of Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice, 6th Edition, St. Louis, Mosby Co. 2005

Ten Eyck RP, Tews M, Ballester JM, Hamilton GC. Improved Fourth-Year Medical Student Clinical Decision-Making Performance as a Resuscitation Team Leader After a Simulation-Based Curriculum. Sim Healthcare, 2010;5:139-145.

Book chapters:

Brown J.E., Hamilton G.C. Chest Pain in Rosen's 5th Ed., Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice, St. Louis, Mosby Co. 2001.

Janz, T.G., Brown J.E. and Hamilton G.C. Acute Chest Pain, in Markovchick V., Pons P.,Wolfe G., Emergency Medicine Secrets, 3rd Ed., Philadelphia, Hanley & Belfus, Inc., 2003.

Brown J.E., Hamilton G.C. Breaking Bad News: Notifying the Living of Death, in Tintinalli, J.E. et al, Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 6th Ed., New York, McGraw-Hill, 2003.

Janz T, Hamilton G.C. Regional Ischemia in Brady W, et al, Emergency Electrocardiography, Philadelphia, Elsevier, 2004.

Hamilton G.C. and Janz T. Hemostasis: Anemia, Polycythemia and White Cell disorders, Rosen's 7th Ed., Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice, St. Louis, Mosby Co. 2009.

Selected Presentations

"Academic Niche/Making Yourself Invaluable" and "Faculty Development", CORD Academic Assembly, New Orleans, LA, February, 2008.

"Faculty Development/Bedside Teaching", Visiting Professor, St. John's Hospital EM Residency, Detroit, MI, October 2008.

Visiting Professor, "Integrating Simulation into the Undergraduate and Graduate Medical Curriculum," New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, April 2009

Visiting Professor, "Academic Niche/Making Yourself Invaluable", Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, October, 2009.

Visiting Professor, "Academic Niche/Making Yourself Invaluable", Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, January, 2010.

Recent Awards

Honorary Fellow, Australasian College of Emergency Medicine

ACEP, Outstanding Contributor in Education, 2005

McCann Scholar, Joy McCann Foundation, 2006

Faculty Mentor Award, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, 2008

Trustees Award (Highest Faculty Award by University), Wright State University, 2009

Personal information

Hamilton familyEmergency medicine has been my academic career for 30 years. After an insightful mentorship by Peter Rosen, M.D., at Denver General from 1977-79, I joined the University of Cincinnati faculty as education director. Moving to Wright State in 1981 to become department chair, I also served as program director until 1989. After more than two decades at Wright State, it remains easy to say "opportunities continue to abound." We have assembled a talented group of faculty who are dedicated to academic emergency medicine. The focus of the department has always been education of medical students, residents and faculty. A new and necessary direction is medical readiness. In 2009, I stepped out of the Chair's role, became Vice-Chair and focused my energies on building a new disaster-oriented "theme park" - Calamityville, or more formally the National Center for Medical Readiness-Tactical Laboratory.

My family - Lynda (M.M. Music), James (M.D., M.B.A., Ohio State), Kate (M.S., Yale), and Elizabeth (Oakwood High School) - and I have traveled far in Dayton. We've raised our family in a supportive environment with friends and colleagues. The Miami Valley has been a true home to us for much of our lives.

My personal lifelong pursuit is to become a Doctor of Motors - 1935 and earlier. Anyone who can identify the car in the photo (below) has my utmost respect! Hint: It's not American, but has 4-speed synchromesh transmission, and independent front suspension. An added hint: its original mascot was prey, but then became predator. You'll never guess as it was the only one in the United States of 29 made and six remaining, but you'd enjoy the drive!

Glenn Hamilton in his car