Integrated Residency in Emergency Medicine

Edward Fieg, D.O., Director

Residency Curriculum

Summary Block Rotations

On-Service Rotations

Off-Service Rotations

Three-Year Didactic Curriculum

Year-Directed Curricula


Summary of Four-Week Block Rotation

R1 Year
Blocks
R2 Year
Blocks
R3 Year
Blocks

Orientation

1.5

Selective

0.5

Selective

1

Adult EM

4

Adult EM

6

Adult EM

5

Combined EM

1

Combined EM

1

Combined EM

1

Pediatric EM

2

Pediatric EM

1

Pediatric EM

1

Pediatric ICU

1

Adult ICU

2

Adult ICU

1

Trauma Surgery

1

Orthopedic Surgery

1

Trauma Surgery + ICU

1

Internal Medicine

1

Hand Surgery

0.5

Adult EM + Teaching

1

Pulmonology

1

Obstetrics & Gynecology

1

Adult EM + EMS

1

Ophthalmology

0.5

 

 

Adult EM + Toxicology +
Sports Medicine + ED Administration

1

Bedside Ultrasonography

0.5

 

 

 

 

 


R1 Year

Our residency follows the R1-R3 format to board certification. The first year of training is designed to provide a broad base for residents to acquire the knowledge, skills, and abilities requisite to emergency medicine throughout the remainder of their training and future careers. R1s are expected to see as wide a variety of patient ages, social situations, presenting complaints, management approaches, and disposition decisions as possible. R1s must also acquire the technical skills in the handling of medical and surgical disorders in all age groups. Graded experiences permit assumption of direct patient care responsibilities. In addition to spending five months in a wide variety emergency departments, off-service rotations are designed to compliment these experiences by concentrating learning efforts in disciplines necessary for the successful practice of emergency medicine. R1s rotate through one month each of general internal medicine, and pulmonology; one month of trauma resuscitation and emergency surgical consultations; and one month in the pediatric intensive care unit immediately following the first pediatric emergency medicine month. R1s receive six hours of lecture and three hours of hands-on laboratory training in bedside ultrasonography during their orientation month. During the first year, each R1 will present two interesting cases to the faculty and other residents during conferences.

R2 Year

The second year of training is designed for more in-depth exposure to emergency medicine. Four months are spent in primarily adult emergency departments where 10 percent of the patient encounters are pediatric. One month is spent in a dedicated pediatric emergency department at a children's hospital. One month is spent in a community emergency department with a pediatric population of 25 percent. R2s are expected to focus on critical care, while refining their skills and efficiency managing less-emergent patients. Off-service rotations compliment this effort with two months in the adult intensive care unit. R2s receive additional concentrated training in orthopedic trauma, hand surgery, ophthalmology, and obstetrics and gynecology. Two weeks are dedicated to bedside ultrasonography with refresher training and hands-on practice with actual patients in emergency departments and an obstetrical clinic. The remainder of that month is reserved as a selective for the R2 to pursue a clinical or administrative area of personal interest, or work on research. During the second year, each R2 will delivery one lecture from "The Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine" and present one interesting case to the faculty and other residents during conferences.

R3 Year

Senior residents are expected to apply and disseminate the knowledge they have gained from their previous training. R3s experience seven months in a wide variety of emergency departments. Off-service rotations include the adult intensive care unit; trauma surgery and the trauma ICU; and outpatient sports medicine clinic with additional experiences covering a variety of high school, college, and professional sporting events. As part of their graded responsibilities, R3s assume more supervisory and educational roles. During the third year, each R3 will delivery two lectures from "The Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine" and present one interesting toxicology case to the faculty and other residents during conferences. During their teaching month, they will also assist in the education of medical students in small-group discussions, high-fidelity simulations, and clinical observation and feedback. R3s are further exposed to EMS management, and the gamut of administrative interfaces that impact the emergency department. A one-month selective is provided to further pursue personal interests. This month may be completed outside the Dayton metropolitan area.